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_______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________ Report Information from ProQuest September 25 2014 17:48 _______________________________________________________________ 25 September 2014 ProQuest Tabla de contenido 1. A different idea of time.................................................................................................................................. 1 25 September 2014 ii ProQuest Document
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   _______________________________________________________________     _______________________________________________________________    Report Information from ProQuest September 25 2014 17:48  _______________________________________________________________    25 September 2014ProQuest   abla de contenido 1. A different idea of time..................................................................................................................................125 September 2014iiProQuest  Documento 1 de 1   A different idea of time Enlace de documentos de ProQuest   Resumen Programming historic buildings and sites requires a special sensitivity on the part of architects andinterior designers. The key to programming historic buildings and sites requires a longer view which willcontinue to benefit building users in generations to follow. Texto completo  Architects, interior designers, and planners need to consider a larger arc of time when theyprogram for historic buildings and sites. This arc extends over several decades into the past and into the future-well beyond the lifetime of the current users. While contemporary design projects may be programmed with anexpected life span of a few years, historic properties are different. An historic building has a voices of the clientsand user, its needs should be carefully considered. This longer view of programming should take into account hsitoric and future patterns of design and use as wellas the building's capacity to support the currently proposed program. The programming porcess for an historicstructure should be an iterative one, where the architect carefully studies the fit between the program's needs.Where the two are in conflict, consideration must be given to altering the program to fit the spaces available.Design professional often over program historic buildings to satisfy a client's demands. Although this appearsbeneficial in the short term, it frequently requires destructive alterations which compromise the historic integrityand devalue the building in the long run. When a building is first designed, it posseses an inherent order and logic related to its srcinal thinking and letthat logic help inform programming decisions. Except for alterations to imrove life safetly, th eprogram shouldnot result in irreversible changes to remaing srcinal elements. The same principles apply for programming anhistoric site. The following examples support this longer view of programming. Expanding the Program with New Architecture: Filoil National Trust Estate, Woodside, California. Historic house museums are often asked to perform many visitor service functions such as fee collections andcomfort services (cafe, restrooms), and accommodate education and orientation spaces including lecture halls,exhibit, and meeting rooms. In many cases these program elements not only cause excessive change to anhistoric house, but also accelerate wear and tear on the historic materials and reduce the space available for historic resource interpretation. 25 September 2014Page 1 of 5ProQuest   At Filoli, a National Trust Property in Woodside, Calif., heavy visitor use of the turn-of-the-century mansion andgarden far educational functions was causing extensive wear and limiting the ability to interpret the building andsite. Recognition of these program-related conflicts led to the construction of a new visitor education buildingthat allows the historic areas of the mansion and its gardens to tell their story to the visitors. Design and siteplanning for the new structure were carefully considered in order to he Located outside of the most historic 25 September 2014Page 2 of 5ProQuest
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