Documents

110 - SJS v. Atienza (2008)

Categories
Published
of 3
All materials on our website are shared by users. If you have any questions about copyright issues, please report us to resolve them. We are always happy to assist you.
Related Documents
Share
Description
LAW
Transcript
  POLI - #110 SJS v. Atienza (2008) Doctrine: While police power rests primarily with the national legislature, such power may be delegated. Section 16 of the LGC, known as the general welfare clause, encapsulates the delegated police power to local governments. LGUs like the City of Manila exercise police power through their respective legislative bodies, in this case, the Sangguniang Panlungsod or the city council. Specifically, the Sanggunian can enact ordinances for the general welfare of the city.  As with the State, local governments may be considered as having properly exercised their police  power only if the following requisites are met: (1) the interests of the public generally, as distinguished  from those of a particular class, require its exercise; and (2) the means employed are reasonably necessary for the accomplishment of the purpose and not unduly oppressive upon individuals. In short, there must be a concurrence of a lawful subject and a lawful method. Facts: Cheveron Philippines Inc, Petron Corporation, Pilipinas Shell Petroleum Corporation and Department of Energy filed their respective motion to intervene after the Supreme Court rendered its decision in the case at bar. Petitioners Social Justice Society (SJS), Vladimir Alarique T. Cabigao and Bonifacio S. Tumboko sought to compel respondent Lito L. Atienza, then Mayor of City of Manila, to enforce Ordinance No. 8027 which reclassified Pandacan area from industrial to commercial and redirected the owners and operators of disallowed businesses to desist from operating their business. Among the disallowed businesses was the “Pandacan Terminal” of the oil companies.  Cheveron, Petron, Shell and DOE question the validity and enforceability of Ordinance No. 8027 and contend that it was superseded by Ordinance No. 8119 also known as the Manila Comprehensive Land Use Plan and Zoning Ordinance of 2006 which gave the oil companies until 2013 to move out. ISSUES:  1. Whether or not Ordinance No. 8119 repealed Ordinance 8027 2. Whether or not Ordinance No. 8027 is valid and enforceable  HELD/RATIO: 1. NO. Repeal by implication proceeds on the premise that where a statute of later date clearly reveals the intention of the legislature to abrogate a prior act on the subject, that intention must be given effect.  Implied repeals are not favored and will not be so declared unless the intent of the legislators is manifest. There are two kinds of implied repeal. The first is: where the provisions in the two acts on the same subject matter are irreconcilably contradictory, the latter act, to the extent of the conflict, constitutes an implied repeal of the earlier one. The second is: if the later act covers the whole subject of the earlier one and is clearly intended as a substitute, it will operate to repeal the earlier law. The oil companies argue that the situation here falls under the first category. For the first kind of implied repeal, there must be an irreconcilable conflict between the two ordinances. However, there was no legislative purpose to repeal Ordinance No. 8027. There is no conflict since both ordinances actually have a common objective, i.e. , to shift the zoning classification from industrial to commercial (Ordinance No. 8027) or mixed residential/commercial (Ordinance No. 8119). While it is true that both ordinances relate to the same subject matter, i.e. , classification of the land use of the area where Pandacan oil depot is located, if there is no intent to repeal the earlier enactment, every effort at reasonable construction must be made to reconcile the ordinances so that both can be given effect. Moreover, it is a well-settled rule in statutory construction that a subsequent general law does not repeal a prior special law on the same subject unless it clearly appears that the legislature has intended by the latter general act to modify or repeal the earlier special law. The special law must be taken as intended to constitute an exception to, or a qualification of, the general act or provision. Ordinance No. 8027 is a special law since it deals specifically with a certain area described therein (the Pandacan oil depot area) whereas Ordinance No. 8119 can be considered a general law as it covers the entire city of Manila. 2. YES. In the exercise of police power, property rights of individuals may be subjected to restraints and burdens in order to fulfil the objectives of the government. Otherwise stated, the government may enact legislation that may interfere with personal liberty, property, lawful businesses and occupations to promote the general welfare. However, the interference must be reasonable and not arbitrary. And to forestall arbitrariness, the methods or means used to protect public health, morals, safety or welfare must have a reasonable relation to the end in view. Ordinance No. 8027 was passed by the Sangguniang Panlungsod of Manila in the exercise of its police power. Police power is the plenary power vested in the legislature to make statutes and ordinances to promote the health, morals, peace, education, good order or safety and general welfare of the people. This power flows from the recognition that salus populi est suprema lex (the welfare of the people is the supreme law). While police power rests primarily with the national legislature, such power may be delegated. Section 16 of the LGC, known as the general welfare clause, encapsulates the delegated police power to local  governments. LGUs like the City of Manila exercise police power through their respective legislative bodies, in this case, the Sangguniang Panlungsod or the city council. Specifically, the Sanggunian can enact ordinances for the general welfare of the city. This police power was also provided for in RA 409 or the Revised Charter of the City of Manila. Specifically, the Sanggunian has the power to reclassify land within the jurisdiction of the city. As with the State, local governments may be considered as having properly exercised their police power only if the following requisites are met: (1) the interests of the public generally, as distinguished from those of a particular class, require its exercise; and (2) the means employed are reasonably necessary for the accomplishment of the purpose and not unduly oppressive upon individuals. In short, there must be a concurrence of a lawful subject and a lawful method. The means adopted by the Sanggunian  was the enactment of a zoning ordinance which reclassified the area where the depot is situated from industrial to commercial. A zoning ordinance is defined as a local city or municipal legislation which logically arranges, prescribes, defines and apportions a given political subdivision into specific land uses as present and future projection of needs. As a result of the zoning, the continued operation of the businesses of the oil companies in their present location will no longer be permitted. The power to establish zones for industrial, commercial and residential uses is derived from the police power itself and is exercised for the protection and benefit of the residents of a locality. Consequently, the enactment of Ordinance No. 8027 is within the power of the Sangguniang Panlungsod   of the City of Manila and any resulting burden on those affected cannot be said to be unjust. Digested by: AERON B. HALOS
We Need Your Support
Thank you for visiting our website and your interest in our free products and services. We are nonprofit website to share and download documents. To the running of this website, we need your help to support us.

Thanks to everyone for your continued support.

No, Thanks