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Standard Edition Section Inquiry # Question Reply 2C 7th Edition, Mar. 2012 5.4 2C-03-13 Question 1: Referring to Section 5.4, in calm water (H sig = 0) I have a A v of 0. That gives me an onboard C v of 1.1. With my crane stiffness I also get a offboard C v of 1.1 or below. That means that the C v for onboard is the same as for offboard. Is that correct? Question 2: I assume that the C v is varying with the SWLH while the PF will be constant according to the highest SWLH the crane
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  StandardEditionSectionInquiry #QuestionReply 2C7th Edition, Mar. 20125.42C-03-13 Question 1: Referring to Section 5.4, in calm water (H sig  = 0) I have a A v of 0. That gives me an onboard C v  of 1.1. With my crane stiffness I also get a offboard C v  of 1.1 or below. That means that the C v  for onboard is the same as for offboard. Is that correct?Question 2: I assume that the C v  is varying with the SWLH while the PF will be constant according to the highest SWLH the crane has, e.g. with a capacity of 560 000 lbf (at 12.5 m) I will get an C v  of 1.1 and a pedestal load factor (PF) of 1.2. With a capacity of 10 000 lbf (at 34 m) the C v  will be 1.33 while the PF remains 1.2. Is that correct?Question 3: My opinion is that the pedestal load factor should give an extra safety for the crane operator in case of entanglement. For an onboard lift the chance for a catastrophic case because of entanglement is not existent. Does that mean we do not apply the PF for onboard lifts? Reply 1: Yes, if your crane stiffness and A v  assumptions are correct.Reply 2: The pedestal load factor must be calculated for each load radius and for each set of lift conditions.Reply 3: No. The PF is applied to both onboard and offboard conditions. The assessment of gross overload prevention (see Section 9) does not have to be done for onboard conditions.2C7th Edition, Mar. 20125.4.52C-02-13 Is it allowed to use two categories for one ship? For example; “ship/barge in calm water” and “drill ship”? If the vessel is a drill ship working in open sea, the answer is no. The appropriate rating would be for a drillship with a small significant wave height for a calm water condition. If a drillship is in a harbor at dockside, dual categories are permitted, however, if you use “ship/barge in calm water” you must also use the defined static list and trim inclinations from Table 5 for that category (ship/barge has more design inclination than the drill ship).2C7th Edition, Mar. 20127.1.22C-01-12 Referring to Section 7.1.2, if we choose to classify our crane with the intermediate duty cycle (Table 7 – for the overall crane) can we choose to give different duty cycles to the crane components, or is it assumed that if we classify the crane as an intermediate duty crane, that all component cycles must also be intermediate duty? The intent is to classify the entire crane (including its components) based on a single expected duty cycle. 2C7th Edition, Mar. 20127.2.5.52C-07-13 In 7.2.5.5 there is stated the following sentence: Design factors shall be determined by dividing the load block minimum plastic failure load by the corresponding load block loads. Could you please advise what is actual meaning of the term minimum plastic failure load ? Namely, I am not sure whether this term means load which cause plastic deformation to the load block (reference stress will be material yield stress in this case) or plastic collapse of load block (in this case, according to my understanding, reference stress will be material ultimate stress). The minimum plastic failure load is referring to the point of permanent plastic deformation. API Spec 2C - Specification for Offshore Pedestal Mounted Cranes Last update: January 4, 2013 Page 1 of 3  StandardEditionSectionInquiry #QuestionReply API Spec 2C - Specification for Offshore Pedestal Mounted Cranes Last update: January 4, 2013 2C7th Edition, Mar. 20127.4.2.12C-06-13 Question 1: Making reference to 7.4.2.1.2 (Swing Circle Service Loads), what is the raceway static capacity that shall not be exceeded? Question 2: Shall I combine the overturning moment M and the axial force H resulting from the indicated simultaneous actions as 4M/D-H (D is the raceway diameter) in order to calculate the equivalent axial load to be compared with the basic static axial load rating Coa of ABMA?Question 3: Is there any factor of safety to be considered between the basic static axial load rating Coa and the equivalent axial load? Reply 1: The raceway static capacity can best be defined as the resultant non-rotating capacity of the raceway that will neither cause the raceway to yield or be permanently indented. It is up to slew bearing manufacturer to define what that capacity is in accordance with 7.4.2.1.6.Reply 2: This corresponds to the ultimate strength of the weakest rolling element in the swing circle assembly, which is defined in 7.4.2.1.6.Reply 3: According to 7.4.2.1.6, the relation between the hook load and the static capacity is based on reactions induced by 3.75 times FL, with crane dead weights, crane motions, crane tilt, offlead, sidelead, and environmental conditions as defined in Section 5.2C7th Edition, Mar. 201211.1.32C-05-13 Background: Section 11.1.3 states materials for cylinders do not require fracture testing unless specified in API 2C. Table 24 in 11.1.5.1 provides fracture toughness requirements for critical components; however I am unsure if cylinders are considered critical components.Question 1: Is a Charpy test required for cylinders in accordance with Table 24? Question 2: Is a Type 3.1 or Type 3.2 steel certificate required for cylinders? Reply 1: No; cylinders are considered machinery and not part of the crane’s structure. The cylinders shall meet the design criteria in 7.3.2.2 or 7.3.3.2, as it pertains to their function.No; API 2C does not require inspection certificates in accordance with EN 10204, Type 3.1 or Type 3.2.2C7th Edition, Mar. 201211.1.5.12C-01-13  Referring to Table 24, there is ambiguity in calculating 10ºF below design temperature. Calculation and conversion of 10ºF below design temperature does not matches corresponding Celsius and vice versa. Should this be read as 10ºC or 18ºF so conversion can match? Conversions between the two temperature scales can cause confusion, especially around the –40ºF to +32ºF (–40ºC to 0ºC) range. Part of the confusion may be that the standard is expressing a difference of 10ºF, not a conversion of the actual 10ºF temperature. A 10ºF difference (below service temperature) corresponds to a temperature difference that is 5.55ºC below whatever the service temperature was (given in Celsius). It is suggested that you work only in the units customary to your testing company to avoid this potential problem.Page 2 of 3  StandardEditionSectionInquiry #QuestionReply API Spec 2C - Specification for Offshore Pedestal Mounted Cranes Last update: January 4, 2013 2C7th Edition, Mar. 201212.1.32C-02-13 Section 12.1.3 requires a strain gauge test or a test load of 2 times the onboard SWLH with a corresponding sideload equal to 4% of the SWLH load. Is it really required to use a test load that high? Our engineered crane SWL is 100T@14 m for the on deck lifts. The test load 2 times SWLH would be 206[T]. Is this correct? The strain gauge test requires a test to the onboard “FL” factored load that is equal to the SWLH times the load factor Cv. This factor Cv could be as low as 1.10 or up to 1.33 for fixed structures. For floating structures, it would be higher based on the vertical acceleration expected of the floating platform. This is a reasonable test load for cranes to verify capacity – if strain gages are used to monitor nominal and peak stresses in the various critical crane components. API references a test procedure that can be used to measure acceptability of the component stresses in the crane. The 200% overload is an option for some cranes where this high load would not cause damage to the crane. one must make measurements and inspections before and after the tests to verify that no gross deformations, cracking, or other damage occurred during the overload test.2C7th Edition, Mar. 2012E.52C-04-13 Annex E, Section E.5 gives a formula for PnNb calculation for ball bearings and 3RR bearings, however, there is no formula for crossed roller bearings. Can we apply the formula for ball bearings to crossed roller bearings, or is there any other formula to apply? The formulae for ball bearings may not be appropriate for a crossed bearing. However, the requirements provided in sections 7.4.2 are. In particular, Sections 7.4.2.1.5 and 7.4.2.1.6 define the strength requirements for the bearings and the fasteners in each of those sections.Page 3 of 3
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