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vi DOI: 10.1057/9781137371218.0001 Contents Acknowledgements vii Preface and Playlist viii Part I Te Background 1 Introduction: Sociology, Uncertainty, and the Possibility of an Imagined Future 2 2 Te Punk Ethos 19 Part II Towards a Punk Sociology 3 From a Punk Ethos to a Punk Sociology 31 4 Relativistic, Open, and Eclectic: Sociological Knowledge 35 5 Raw, Stripped Back, and Fearless: Communicating Sociology 43 6 Bold, Inventive, and the Do-It-Yourself Ethic: Te Sociolo
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   vi 󰁄󰁏󰁉: 󰀱󰀰.󰀱󰀰󰀵󰀷/󰀹󰀷󰀸󰀱󰀱󰀳󰀷󰀳󰀷󰀱󰀲󰀱󰀸.󰀰󰀰󰀰󰀱 Contents Acknowledgements viiPreface and Playlist viiiPart I Te Background󰀱 Introduction: Sociology, Uncertainty, and the Possibility of an Imagined Future 󰀲󰀲 Te Punk Ethos 󰀱󰀹Part II owards a Punk Sociology 󰀳 From a Punk Ethos to a Punk Sociology 󰀳󰀱󰀴 Relativistic, Open, and Eclectic: Sociological Knowledge 󰀳󰀵󰀵 Raw, Stripped Back, and Fearless: Communicating Sociology 󰀴󰀳󰀶 Bold, Inventive, and the Do-It-Yourself Ethic: Te Sociological errain 󰀵󰀳󰀷 Conclusion: Te Limits of Punk Sociology and a Glimpse into Its Future 󰀶󰀱References 󰀷󰀱Index 󰀷󰀶 Copyrighted Material – 9781137371201Copyrighted Material – 9781137371201  󰁄󰁏󰁉: 󰀱󰀰.󰀱󰀰󰀵󰀷/󰀹󰀷󰀸󰀱󰀱󰀳󰀷󰀳󰀷󰀱󰀲󰀱󰀸.󰀰󰀰󰀰󰀴 Part I Te Background Copyrighted Material – 9781137371201Copyrighted Material – 9781137371201  󰁄󰁏󰁉: 󰀱󰀰.󰀱󰀰󰀵󰀷/󰀹󰀷󰀸󰀱󰀱󰀳󰀷󰀳󰀷󰀱󰀲󰀱󰀸.󰀰󰀰󰀰󰀴 󰀲 1 Introduction: Sociology, Uncertainty and the Possibility of an Imagined Future Abstract:   Tis chapter focuses upon the disciplinary and social contexts in which sociology operates. It identifies a general sense of uncertainty in the discipline. It also outlines the challenges of the neoliberal academy. Tis chapter argues that in order to prevent sociology from withering, and to ensure its vibrant future, we need to turn to alternative forms of knowledge. Tis chapter suggests that punk might provide a source of inspiration  for developing creativity, inventiveness, and liveliness in sociology. Beer, David. Punk Sociology  . Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 􀀲󰀰󰀱󰀴. 󰁤󰁯󰁩: 󰀱󰀰.󰀱󰀰󰀵󰀷/󰀹󰀷󰀸󰀱󰀱󰀳󰀷󰀳󰀷󰀱􀀲󰀱󰀸.󰀰󰀰󰀰󰀴. Copyrighted Material – 9781137371201Copyrighted Material – 9781137371201  􀀳 󰁄󰁏󰁉: 󰀱󰀰.󰀱󰀰󰀵󰀷/󰀹󰀷󰀸󰀱󰀱󰀳󰀷󰀳󰀷󰀱󰀲󰀱󰀸.󰀰󰀰󰀰󰀴 Introduction It is probably air to say that there is quite a bit o uncertainty in sociology at the moment. Tis sense o uncertainty doesn’t look like it is likely to leave any time soon. Tis is nothing new. Sociology is renowned or its almost chronic sense o crisis. It could even be said that a continual sense o crisis has dogged large parts o its history. John Holmwood (󰀲󰀰󰀱󰀰: 󰀶󰀵󰀰) has pointed out, or instance, that ‘sociology has to be achieved against an internal tendency to sel-subversion’. Tis is perhaps illustrative o a discipline that lacks sel-esteem, a discipline that is sel-conscious, and maybe even insecure – as Arthur Stinchcombe (󰀱󰀹󰀹󰀴) has put it, a ‘disintegrated discipline’. Stinchcombe (󰀱󰀹󰀹󰀴) argues that ragmenta-tion is a central problem in orging a solid uture or sociology. What Stinchcombe is concerned with is the growing inability o sociology, as a ‘disintegrated discipline’, to deend itsel. At the heart o the ragmen-tation or ‘disintegration’ described by Stinchcombe (󰀱󰀹󰀹󰀴: 󰀲󰀸󰀳) is the ‘wide variety o substantive subject matter in disintegrated disciplines, and the strong boundaries around substantive specialities’. Stinchcombe suggests that this simply ‘means that people cannot get interested in each other’s work’. Tis type o disciplinary segmentation has been echoed in Andrew Abbott’s (󰀲󰀰󰀰󰀱) classic study o the Chaos o Disciplines . In this book Abbott describes how ‘ractal distinctions’ carve up disciplines and make dialogue both within and between disciplines extremely difficult. As I will describe in this book though, a more open orm o diversity in the discipline is something we might strive or. We need to find a way to resolve the heightened orms o specialization that translate into the barriers that prevent cross-ertilization. Despite the problems and diffi-culties, and this might be considered a little naïve and utopian, we might look to cut across the distinctions and specialisms that currently divide those with a shared i diverse interest in what Becker (󰀲󰀰󰀰󰀷) calls ‘telling about society’.Given the apparent ragmentation it has experienced, it is perhaps not surprising that Steve Fuller (󰀲󰀰󰀰󰀶: 󰀱), in his attempts to think through a ‘new sociological imagination’ suitable or our times, has even sug-gested that sociology is ‘suffering rom an identity crisis’. But can we let this broader sense o uncertainty permeate into our sociology? Can we let it shape and define our practice and our collective sociological imagination? Perhaps a better question would be to ask i we should let this uncertainty come to inhibit and restrict what C. Wright Mills (󰀱󰀹󰀵󰀹) called the ‘promise’ o sociology. A sense o crisis might help us to rethink our purpose and approach, but i lef unattended it might also Copyrighted Material – 9781137371201Copyrighted Material – 9781137371201

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