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Development of Instructionally Sound Learning Objectives

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This paper discusses the importance of learning objectives as an outcome of the needs assessment process as well as their requirements. It discusses the relative importance and impact of the decisions used in the process of their development as well as the contributing areas, such as the three learning domains, the role of Bloom’s Taxonomy, the components of learning objectives and the differences between instructional goals and objectives. Authentic examples are also given from a perspective of application to jobsite safety and the consequential meaning of the observations and decisions made on the basis of the training and information available. This report also discusses the importance of learning objectives being measurable components of daily life and the importance this has to the concept of developing instructionally sound learning objectives.
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  Running head: DEVELOPMENT OF INSTRUCTIONALLY SOUND LEARNING 1 Development of Instructionally Sound Learning Objectives Unit 3 Individual Project (IP) Kelvin Bell American InterContinental University Online EDU621-1203B-01 August 10, 2012 Dr. Jim Hite  DEVELOPMENT OF INSTRUCTIONALLY SOUND LEARNING 2 Abstract This paper discusses the importance of learning objectives as an outcome of the needs assessment process as well as their requirements. It discusses the relative importance and impact of the decisions used in the process of their development as well as the contributing areas, such as the three learning domains, the role of Bloom’s Taxonomy, the components of learning objectives and the differences between instructional goals and objectives. Authentic examples are also given from a perspective of application to jobsite safety and the consequential meaning of the observations and decisions made on the basis of the training and information available. This report also discusses the importance of learning objectives being measurable components of daily life and the importance this has to the concept of developing instructionally sound learning objectives.  DEVELOPMENT OF INSTRUCTIONALLY SOUND LEARNING 3 Development of Instructionally Sound Learning Objectives The development of instructionally sound learning objectives should be of paramount consideration of most educators and educational institutions since these are the important, measurable, individual results that are desired. It’s one thing to say that the goal of a curriculum is that the student should be proficient in some math, science, or other discipline, and quite another to define that proficiency in terms of learner levels of accomplishment and accountability, based on specific circumstances and to what degree. These measurable characteristics are important relative to the various stakeholders in the process, whether this is strictly an academic environment, such as a public school or university or whether it is in a corporate training, military installation, construction site, or other environment. The process and the accountability provides a means by which instructors, facilitators, and learners can all be held to some degree of accountability as well as specific progress that meets the needs set forth in more detail than just a mere general statement of effect. This discussion covers various constructs related to this process and provides insight into the relationships that guide (or should guide) the development of instructionally sound learning objectives. Examples will be provided from various areas, but will focus primarily on examples related to construction site safety for this particular discussion. The Three Domains of Learning Objectives: Affective, Psychomotor, Cognitive Research has shown the importance of understanding that learning is most effective when it involves engaging the learner in more than one of the three domains of learning (Affective, Psychomotor, or Cognitive) (Holden, 2009). Dick, Carey, and Carey (2009) refer to the different domains of learning as being categories. These categories are related to: motivation, emotion,  DEVELOPMENT OF INSTRUCTIONALLY SOUND LEARNING 4 interest, and attention  –  Affective (Picard, et. al., 2004); physical or kinesthetic skills (Holden, 2009) or activities  –  Psychomotor, or Cognitive  –  thinking skills. In the working scenario  –   Jobsite Safety  –   the goal is to keep workers safe on a daily  basis. So it is desirable for them to be thinking about jobsite safety, safety equipment, a safe work environment, safe site conditions, etc.  –   Cognitive; Additionally, we want them to be affected in emotionally and/or valuation terms in relation to why it’s important for them to maintain a safe environment and to make sure that they and their co-workers take responsibility for everyone getting home safely  –   Affective; and, finally, from a psychomotor perspective, it is important that they take relevant action(s) to insure that hazards are removed and that the site remains safe. Some companies take the approach that “jobsite safety is important, so pay attention, watch out for hazards, and do no harm.” On the other hand, there are companies which wil l not allow new workers on the site without first requiring them to go through a 2-hour safety orientation course to address the goal of returning everyone home safely, but gets into the objectives related to specific conditions, deportment, hazard assessment skills, and responsibilities. Parsons (2007) relates this type of response to a corporate “culture” or mindset that is supported (and enforced) throughout the organization. In this regard, safety is not something that just happens. It is the result of deliberate action which involves all three domains. Parson (2007) also relates the importance of measurement as a means of motivating action towards amended performance in the cases where there is a need to change, rather than maintain, existing procedures. With measurement in mind, from a learning perspective he sees the cognitive domain as “learning to measure” and the affective domain as “measuring to learn”.  

The Dhamapada

Jul 23, 2017
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