Health & Lifestyle

Green and energy efficiency in access networks and cloud infrastructures

Published
of 23
All materials on our website are shared by users. If you have any questions about copyright issues, please report us to resolve them. We are always happy to assist you.
Related Documents
Share
Description
Green and energy efficiency in access networks and cloud infrastructures Ahmed Amokrane To cite this version: Ahmed Amokrane. Green and energy efficiency in access networks and cloud infrastructures. Mobile
Transcript
Green and energy efficiency in access networks and cloud infrastructures Ahmed Amokrane To cite this version: Ahmed Amokrane. Green and energy efficiency in access networks and cloud infrastructures. Mobile Computing. Université Pierre et Marie Curie - Paris VI, English. NNT : 2014PA066642 . tel HAL Id: tel https://tel.archives-ouvertes.fr/tel Submitted on 11 May 2015 HAL is a multi-disciplinary open access archive for the deposit and dissemination of scientific research documents, whether they are published or not. The documents may come from teaching and research institutions in France or abroad, or from public or private research centers. L archive ouverte pluridisciplinaire HAL, est destinée au dépôt et à la diffusion de documents scientifiques de niveau recherche, publiés ou non, émanant des établissements d enseignement et de recherche français ou étrangers, des laboratoires publics ou privés. THÈSE DE DOCTORAT DE l UNIVERSITÉ PIERRE ET MARIE CURIE Spécialité Informatique Ecole doctorale Informatique, Télécommunications et Electronique (Paris) Présentée par Ahmed AMOKRANE Pour obtenir le grade de DOCTEUR de l UNIVERSITÉ PIERRE ET MARIE CURIE Sujet de la thèse : Green et E cacité en Energie dans les Réseaux d Accès et les Infrastructures Cloud Soutenance le 8 Décembre 2014 Devant le jury composé de : Pr. Olivier Festor Dr. Nathalie Mitton Pr. Raouf Boutaba Dr. Jin Xiao Dr. Marcelo Dias de Amorim Pr. Jean-Louis Rougier Pr. Guy Pujolle Dr. Rami Langar Rapporteur, INRIA Nancy, France Rapporteur, INRIA Lille-Nord Europe, Lille, France Examinateur, University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada Examinateur, IBM Research, T.J. Watson, New York, USA Examinateur, UPMC (Paris 6), France Examinateur, Telecom ParisTech, Paris, France Directeur de thèse, UPMC (Paris 6), France Co-directeur de thèse, UPMC (Paris 6), France ii Abstract Over the last decade, there has been an increasing use of personal wireless communications devices, such as mobile phones, wireless-enabled laptops, smartphones and tablets. With the widespread availability of wireless broadband access, an environment in which anywhere, any-time access to data and services has been created. These services are supported by data storage and processing infrastructure (commonly referred to as the cloud) located in large centralized facilities spread around the globe. Accessing cloud services over wireless networks has then rapidly emerged as the driving trend. However, such wireless cloud network consumes a non-negligible amount of energy. Indeed, according to recent studies, the number of wireless cloud users worldwide has been grown by 69% in 2014 and will have the same carbon footprint as adding another 4.9 million cars onto the roads by Consequently, the cloud infrastructure energy consumption and carbon emission are becoming a major concern in IT industry. In this context, we address, in this thesis, the problem of reducing energy consumption and carbon footprint, as well as building green infrastructures in the two di erent parts of the wireless cloud: (i) wireless access networks including wireless mesh and campus networks, and (ii) data centers in a cloud infrastructure. In the first part of the thesis, we present an energy-e cient framework for joint routing and link scheduling in multihop TDMA-based wireless networks. Our objective is to find an optimal tradeo between the achieved network throughput and energy consumption. To do so, we first proposed an optimal approach, called Optimal Green Routing and Link Scheduling (O-GRLS), by formulating the problem as an Integer Linear Program (ILP). As this problem is NP-Hard, we then proposed a simple yet e cient heuristic algorithm based on Ant Colony, called AC-GRLS. At a later stage, we extended this framework to cover campus networks using the emerging Software Defined Networking (SDN) paradigm. Indeed, an online flow-based routing approach that allows dynamic reconfiguration of existing flows as well as dynamic link rate adaptation is proposed. The formulated objective function has been then extended to take into account the costs for switching between sleeping and active modes of nodes, as well as re-routing or consolidating existing flows. Our proposed approach takes into account users demands and mobility, and is compliant with the SDN paradigm since it can be integrated as an application on top of an SDN controller that monitors and manages the network and decides on flow routes and link rates. Results show that our approaches are able to achieve significant gains in terms of energy consumption, compared to conventional routing solutions, such as the shortest path routing, the minimum link residual capacity routing metric, and the load-balancing scheme. In the second part of this thesis, we address the problem of reducing energy consumption and carbon footprint of cloud infrastructures. Specifically, we proposed optimization approaches for reducing the energy costs and carbon emissions of a cloud provider owning distributed infrastructures of data centers with variable electricity prices and carbon emissions from two di erent perspectives. First, we propose Greenhead, a holistic management framework for embedding Virtual Data Centers (i.e., virtual machines with guaranteed bandwidth between them) across geographically distributed data centers connected through a backbone network. Our objective here is to maximize the cloud provider s revenue while ensuring that the infrastructure is as environment-friendly as possible. Then, we investigated how a cloud provider can meet Service Level Agreements (SLAs) with green requirements; that is, a cloud customer requires a maximum amount of carbon emission generated by the resources leased from the cloud provider. We hence propose Greenslater, a resource management framework that allows cloud providers to provision resources in the form of VDCs across their geo-distributed infrastructure with the aim of reducing operational costs and green SLA violation penalties. Results show that the proposed solutions improve requests acceptance ratio and maximize the cloud provider s profit, as well as minimize the violation of green SLAs, while ensuring high usage of renewable energy and minimal carbon footprint. Key Words Energy E ciency, Green, Wireless Mesh Networks, Campus Networks, Cloud, Distributed Clouds, Virtual Data Center, VDC Embedding, Optimization, Ant Colony, Green SLA iii List of Figures 1 Résultats de simulation de comparaison de AC-GRLS, SP et MRC in dans le cas de grands réseaux mesh (100 noeuds) avec 95 clients Architecture typique d un réseau de campus Comparison des valuers moyennes de di érentes métriques (100 APs, 27 switchs avec 2 Gateways, taux d arrivée des client dans le réseau à 70 requêtes/hour) Exemple de delpoiment d un VDC dans une infrastructure Cloud distribuée 8 5 Placement de VDCs dans une infrastructure Cloud distribuée Comparison des valeurs moyennes de di érentes métriques Comparaison des valeurs cumulatives de di érentes métriques Comparison of the objective function values for O-GRLS, AC-GRLS, SP and MRC in small-sized WMNs Simulation results for O-GRLS, AC-GRLS, SP and MRC in small-sized WMNs with 15 clients Simulation results for AC-GRLS, SP and MRC in large-sized WMNs with 95 clients Achieved throughput, flow acceptance ratio, and proportion of used nodes vs. Number of mesh clients (100 nodes, 9 gateways, =0.45) Achieved throughput, flow acceptance ratio, and proportion of used nodes vs. Number of mesh clients (100 nodes, 9 gateways, =0.75) Impact of number of sub-channels on AC-GRLS in small-sized WMNs with 15 clients Impact of number of sub-channels on AC-GRLS in large-sized WMNs with 95 clients Achieved throughput and consumed energy when varying the number of mesh clients and (100 nodes, 9 gateways, 4 sub-channels) A typical campus network topology Comparison of energy consumption for variable arrival rates (100 APs, 27 switches with 2 gateway routers) Comparison of energy consumption for variable reconfiguration intervals (100 APs, 27 switches with 2 gateway routers, = 50 requests/hour) Comparison of power consumption and acceptance ratio over time for = 80 requests/hour (100 APs, 27 switches with 2 gateway routers) iv 4.5 Comparison of the average values of the di erent metrics (100 APs, 27 switches with 2 gateway routers, = 80 requests/hour) Comparison of the average values of the di erent metrics (250 APs, 40 switches with 4 Gateways, = 90 requests/hour) Example of VDC deployment over a distributed infrastructure VDC embedding across multiple data centers Available renewables, electricity price, carbon footprint per unit of power and cost per unit of carbon in the data centers Cumulative objective function obtained with Greenhead, the baseline and the ILP solver Greenhead vs the baseline. ( = 8 requests/hour, 1/µ = 6 hours, P loc = 0.15, duration=48 hours) Acceptance ratio and revenue for di erent arrival rates (P loc =0.10) Impact of the fraction of location-constrained VMs. ( = 8 requests/hour) Power consumption across the infrastructure ( = 8 requests/hour, P loc = 0.20) The utilization of the renewables in all data centers for di erent fractions of location-contained nodes P loc for Greenhead ( = 8 requests/hour) Comparison of the average values of the di erent metrics The carbon footprint (normalized values) of the whole infrastructure with variable cost per ton of carbon The power from the grid (normalized values) used in di erent data centers with variable cost per ton of carbon Proposed Greenslater framework Impact of variable arrival rate (P loc =0.05, T = 24 hours, = 4 hours) Impact of variable location probability P loc ( = 4 requests/hour, T =24 hours, = 4 hours) Impact of variable reporting period T ( = 4 requests/hour, P loc =0.05, = 4 hours) Impact of variable reconfiguration interval ( = 4 requests/hour, P loc = 0.05, T = 24 hours) Comparison of the cumulative values of the di erent metrics ( = 4 requests/hour, P loc =0.05, T = 24 hours, = 4 hours) v List of Tables 3.1 AC-GRLS simulation parameters Computation time (in seconds) for O-GRLS, AC-GRLS, MRC, and SP schemes Table of notations AC-OFER simulation parameters Energy saving comparison with the optimal solution Computation time comparison (in milliseconds) Table of notations Computation time for Greenhead, the baseline and the ILP solver (in milliseconds) vi Table of Contents List of Figures List of Tables iv vi Résumé de la thèse 1 1 Introduction Contexte et motivations Contributions Routage et ordonnancement des liens e cace en énergie dans les réseaux multi-sauts de type TDMA Gestion des flux de trafic de manière dynamique pour une e cacité énergétique dans les réseaux de campus Greenhead: Placement de data center virtuels (Virtual Data Centers) dans une infrastructure distribuée de data centers Greenslater: Les Green SLAs dans les infrastructures Cloud distibuées 11 4 Organisation de la thèse Introduction Context and Motivations Contributions Green Routing and Link Scheduling in TDMA-based Multihop Networks Online flow-based management for energy e cient campus networks Greenhead: Virtual Data Center Embedding Across Distributed Infrastructures Greenslater: Providing green SLA in distributed clouds Outline vii viii I Energy E ciency in Access Networks 18 2 Energy Reduction in Wireless and Wired Networks: State of the Art Introduction Energy Reduction in WLANs and Campus Networks Energy Reduction in WMNs Energy Reduction in Cellular Networks Energy Reduction in Wired Networks Discussion Conclusion Energy E cient TDMA-based Wireless Mesh Networks Introduction System Model Network Model Interference Model AP Energy Consumption Model Tra c Model Problem Formulation A Framework for Energy E cient Management in TDMA-based WMNs O-GRLS Method AC-GRLS Method Performance Evaluation Single channel WMNs Multichannel WMNs Conclusion Online Flow-based Routing for Energy E cient Campus Networks Introduction System Model Network Model AP Energy Consumption Model Switch Energy Consumption Model Tra c Model Problem Formulation AC-OFER Proposal Network Event Handling... 52 ix Dynamic network reconfiguration using Ant Colony Online Flow-based Energy e cient Routing (AC-OFER) Performance Evaluation Baselines Simulation parameters Convergence to the optimal solution and computation time Impact of arrival rate Impact of the reconfiguration time T Power consumption over time Scalability of AC-OFER Conclusion II Energy E cient and Green Distributed Clouds 64 5 Green and Energy Reduction in Clouds: State of the Art Introduction Greening Cloud Infrastructures: Motivations Energy reduction inside a single data center Energy Reduction Across Multiple Data Centers Virtual Network Embedding and Mapping Green Service Level Agreements in the Cloud Discussion Conclusion Greenhead: Virtual Data Center Embedding Across Distributed Infrastructures Introduction System Architecture Problem Formulation VDC Partitioning And Embedding VDC Partitioning Partition Embedding Problem Performance Evaluation Simulation Settings Simulation results Conclusion... 93 x 7 Greenslater: On Providing Green SLAs in Distributed Clouds Introduction System Architecture Architecture Overview Green SLA Definition Problem Formulation Green SLA optimzer (Greenslater) VDC Partitioning Admission Control Partitions Embedding Dynamic Partition Relocation Performance Evaluation Simulation Settings Simulation Results Conclusion III Conclusion and Future Work Conclusion and Future Work Conclusions Future Work List of Publications 113 Bibliography 114 Résumé de la thèse 1 Introduction Dans cette thèse, nous nous sommes intéressés à la réduction de la consommation d énergie dans les réseaux d accès sans fil et dans les infrastructures Clouds distribuées. Dans ce chapitre, nous résumons le contexte et les contributions de cette thèse. Nous commencerons par le contexte et les motivations de nos travaux autours de la réduction de la consommation d énergie et l empreinte en carbone des Technologies de l Information et de la Communication (TIC) d aujourd hui. Puis, nous décrirons les approches qu on a proposées pour les réseaux sans fil multi-sauts, les réseaux de campus et les infrastructures Cloud distribuées. 2 Contexte et motivations Au cours des denières années, le secteur des TIC a vu augmenter sa consommation d énergie d une manière spéctaculaire. A cela s ajoute une augmentation dans les empreintes en carbone. En e et, le secteur des TIC à lui seul a consommé 3% de l énergie dans le monde et son empreinte en carbone était de 2% en Ce chi re est équivalent à celui du secteur de l aéronautique et au quart de celui de l automobile [1]. De plus, selon un récent rapport publié en ligne par le directeur général du groupe Digital Power Mark Mills [2], l écosystème des TIC, qui comprend le Cloud ainsi que les appareils numériques et les réseaux sans fil permettant d accéder à ses services, enregistre actuellement une consommation proche de 10 % de la consommation d électricité dans le monde entier. De plus, l analyse mise à jour du rapport SMART 2020 [3] montre un changement par rapport à l empreinte énergétique du secteur des TIC des smartphones et téléphones mobiles vers les data centers et les réseaux. Plus particulièrement, les réseaux et les data centers compteront chacun d eux pour 25 % de la consommation énergétique des TIC [3, 4]. Cette augmentation de la consommation d énergie est principalement dûe à la prolifération et la généralisation de l accès haut débit sans fil et la migration massive des services vers le Cloud. En e et, d un côté, les réseaux d accès sont de plus en plus gourmands en énergie et extrêmement polluants. Plus précisément, au cours de la dernière décennie, il y a eu une utilisation croissante des équipements de communication personnels sans fil, tels que les téléphones mobiles, les smartphones, les tablettes et les ordinateurs portables. Avec la généralisation de l accès haut débit sans fil, un environnement dans lequel n importe où, l accès à tout moment aux données et aux services a été créé. De ce fait, l accès à ces services hébergés dans le Cloud moyennant des réseaux sans fil est ensuite rapidement apparu comme une tendance incontournable. Cependant, cette association réseau sans fil et could (appelé Cloud sans fil), dont le tra c augmente de 95% chaque année [5, 6], consomme une quantité considérable d énergie. En e et, selon des études récentes, le nombre d utilisateurs du Cloud sans fil dans le monde entier a progressé de 69 % en 2014, et l empreinte en carbone qui en résultera serait équivalente à l ajout de 4,9 millions de 1 3. Contributions 2 voitures sur les routes d ici à 2015 [6]. D autre part, ces services sont hébergés par des infrastructures de stockage de données et de traitement (communément appelé le Cloud) situés dans les grands data centers répartis dans le monde. Selon un rapport publié par Greenpeace en 2013 [4], si le Cloud était un pays, il se serait classé au sixième rang des pays les plus consommateurs en électricité. En outre, la demande en énergie des data centers à elle seule a augmenté de 40 GW en 2013, soit une augmentation de 7 % par rapport à 2012 [7]. Ce chi re continuera sa hausse de manière significative d ici 2020 [3]. De plus, cette forte consommation d énergie est accompagnée d émissions élevées en carbone, pour la simple raison que les principaux modes de production d électricité reposent sur des sources fossiles et non renouvelables [8, 9]. De ce fait, l économie d énergie et la réduction des empreintes en carbone dans les réseaux et les infrastructures Cloud devient un important axe de recherche au sein de la communauté des chercheurs et les industriels du secteur. En e et, plusieurs études ont montré un mouvement vers la réduction de la consommation d énergie et les émissions en carbone des entreprises du secteur des TIC [10 13]. Le premier objectif de ces entreprises étant de réduire les coûts d opération dus au prix de l électricité qui peut être assez conséquent. De plus, ces entreprises souhaitent a cher leurs responsabilités quant à la contribution à la réduction du réchau ement climatique. Dans ce contexte, les infrastructures économes et e caces en énergie se sont imposées comme une solution prometteuse pour réduire les coûts opératoires, augmenter la rentabilité et assurer la durabilité des réseaux d accès et des infrastructures Cloud. Dans ce contexte, nous nous sommes intéressés dans cette thèse aux solutions et stratégies pour des réseaux d accès et infrastructures Cloud économes en énergie et d empreinte en carbone réduite. Plus particulièrement, nous nous sommes focalisés sur les infrastructures Cloud qui vont des réseaux d accès aux data centers coeurs. En e et, nous nous sommes intéressés d abord à la réduction de la consommation d énergie dans les réseaux d accès sans fil de types mesh et les réseaux de campus. Ensuite, avons travaillé sur les infrastructures Cloud. Dans ce cas, avons présenté des solutions des solutions pour la gestion d infrastructures Cloud distribuées. Dans ce qui suit, nous résumons les contributions de cette thèse. 3 Contributions Dans cette thèse, nous avons abordé deux défis majeurs dans les infrastructures de Cloud mobiles. Plus précisément, nous présentons quatre contributions pour les infrastructures é caces en énergie et écologiques, dans les réseaux d accès et dans le Cloud. La première contribution traite la réduction de l énergie dans les réseaux sans fil multi-sauts opérant en TDMA. La deuxième contribution traite l e cacité énergétique à l échelle des réseaux de campus. Puis, les deux dernières contributions s intéressent à l e cacit
Search
Related Search
We Need Your Support
Thank you for visiting our website and your interest in our free products and services. We are nonprofit website to share and download documents. To the running of this website, we need your help to support us.

Thanks to everyone for your continued support.

No, Thanks