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Hamlet Notes

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My notes on Hamlet while studying English Literature at London University External Programme.
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  University of LondonExplorations IIHAMLET NOTES ACT IScene i Horatio comments that the presence of the host fore!odes some strane er#ption to o#r state $ It is !elieved that it has to do %ith &ortin!ras threats to invade 'anmar($ )*+,Scene ii  Cla#di#s #ses ela!orate fi#res of speech to cover #p his #ilt$ )p$ -.,  Mo#rnin is an inner feelin for Hamlet$ This points to his later inner conflict a!o#t the co#rse of action he sho#ld ta(e$ )/.0*,  Hamlet s first solilo1#y is directed to his mother2 frailty3 thy name is %oman 3 O3 most %ic(ed speed3 to post %ith s#ch dexterity to incest#o#s sheets4 $ )p$ -+,  5hen he learns a!o#t the host he says that &o#l deeds %ill rise$ )677,Scene iii ã 8oloni#s famo#s advice to his son may %ell point to the real pro!lem of the play so far2 %hat is one9s tr#e self: Appearance and reality are conf#sed3 and the reality of thine own self   remains do#!tf#l$ ã Laertes9s %arnin speech to Ophelia$ )p$ 6;0/,Scene iv ã Hamlet9s comment that one defect miht o#t%eih all the ood 1#alities of a person$ This miht refer to himself and in his %averin !et%een action and ponderin$ )p$ .7, ã Marcell#s9s comment that <Somethin is rotten in the state of 'enmar($9 )+=,Scene v ã His father9s host tells him that he cannot have rest #ntil the crimes he has s#ffered have !een revened$ )p$ >-, ã Hamlet9s second solilo1#y2 passionate? thin(in a!o#t ta(in revene$ )p$ >7, ã His comment to Horatio that <There are more thins in heaven and earth @ than are dreamt of in yo#r philosophy$9 )-**, ã After contemplatin a!o#t revene in his passionate reaction to the host9s revelation3 he exclaims <O c#rsed spite3 that ever I %as !orn to set it riht49 )-/+,ACT IIScene ii ã Hamlet p#les even himself %ith his chane of attit#de3 alternatin !et%een melancholy and elation$ ã He realises that if veneance is to !e ta(en it %ill not come as a res#lt of reasonin$ Its so#rce %ill !e passion and it is in the context of passion that the the  passionate speech  of the &irst 8layer ta(es its proper place$ &or Hamlet it holds the mirror up to nature 3 the desired res#lt is achieved !y the comminlin of passion and B#dement$ ã Hamlet9s comment that <to !e honest @ is to !e one man pic(ed o#t of ten tho#sand9 applies even to himself3 %ho has to pretend to et %hat he %ants$ ã In his conversation %ith osencrant and D#ildestern he says that the %orld is neither ood nor !ad !#t it depends on %hat yo# ta(e it to !e$ &or him the %orld is a prison and he %ishes he <co#ld !e !o#nded in a n#stshell3 and co#nt )him,self a (in of infinitespace3 %ere it not that )he, had !ad dreams$ ã His third solilo1#y3 %here he acc#ses himself of !ein <a ro#e and peasant slave9 for not ta(in immediate action$ )p$ +-, ã He thin(s a!o#t his ploy3 %hich %ill prove %hether the host is evil or not$ )p$ +.,ACT IIIScene I  University of LondonExplorations IIHAMLET NOTES ã Hamlet extends his do#!ts a!o#t the Dhost to the %hole s#peranat#ral %orld expressinhis fears of the life after death$ y the end of his most famo#s speech he has come to terms %ith his dilemma? action has disappeared in spec#lation$ ã Cla#di#s hints at his terri!le deed reactin in 8oloni#s9s speech a!o#t p#ttin #p s%eet appearances to hide evil thins$ )p$ +;, ã Hamlet9s fo#rth solilo1#y$ )p$ +;, ã His conversation %ith Ophelia reveals misoynist vie%s$ )p$ -=60.,Scene ii ã The nat#re of the str#le !et%een Hamlet and the Fin is clarified !y Hamlet9s intellect#al endeavo#r to !alance passion and tho#ht G blood and judgemet $ This endeavo#r is for him to attain an o!Bectively correct vie% of nat#re$ ã The player0(in9s speech is sinificant in at least t%o %ays2  &irst3 its ordered movement of rhymin co#plets3 presentin %ise eneralisations onthe nat#re of man and his actions3 contrasts vividly %ith the lan#ae of the rest of the play$  Second3 li(e Hamlet9s advice to the player at the !einnin of the scene3 it stands for a temperate vie% of action and life3 #nli(e the player01#een9s extravaant protestations of devotion$ ã The player0(in9s comment that <5hat to o#rselves in passion %e propose3 the passion endin3 doth the p#rpose lose9 co#ld apply to Hamlet himself$ )-/6, ã His fifth solilo1#y3 %here he tries to ma(e ro#se himself from his contemplations and !ecome passionate$ )p$ -6;,Scene iii ã He does not (ill Cla#di#s !eca#se his B#dement prevails over his passion$ ã His sixth solilo1#y3 %hich is a revelation of his character in that he can act impet#o#sly3on the sp#r of an imp#lse3 !#t he cannot act %hen there is time to ta(e tho#ht$Scene iv ã In his invective aainst his mother he !ecomes really cr#el %hen he tells her that she sho#ld not have sex#al imp#lses in her ae$ )p$ -.+, ã Dertr#de feels remorse$ ã Hamlet feels that he m#st the Dod9s sco#re and minister$ )-;*,ACT IScene I ã Cla#di#s feels threatened$ )p$ ->+,Scene ii ã Cla#di#s thin(s of ta(in meas#res$ )p$ -7.,Scene iv ã Hamlet compares the #rent and f#ll0scale action of &ortin!ras action over a trivial point of hono#r3 %ith his o%n inaction in the face of the ravest offence$Scene v ã Ophelia9s en#ine distraction is to !e seen aainst his o%n developed presence of mind and B#dement$ ã Laertes9 passionate acc#sations and threats sho% him to !e at this stae3 li(e Hamlet3 amenace to Cla#di#s$ ã Ophelia9s comment that <%e (no% %hat %e are !#t (no% not %hat %e may !e$9 )>6,Scene vii  University of LondonExplorations IIHAMLET NOTES ã The str#ct#ral contrasts of passion and reason are emphasied yet aain2 Laertes is no%firm in his passion for revene %hile Hamlet9s %idely respected rep#tation as a %ise prince is asserted$ACT Scene I ã As the play moves nearer to the impendin death str#le3 the ravediers provide some h#mo#ro#s relief and their activities lead Hamlet the theme of %ills and fates$ ã Hamlet9s comment that thins %ill ta(e their nat#ral co#rse %hatever people do to infl#ence them$ )p$ 6=.,Scene ii ã The acco#nt of the death of osecrant and D#ildenstern is postponed #ntil this stae3 perhaps !eca#se it sho%s her most effectively ho% Hamlet has chaned since he left forEnland? this is a 1#ic(3 deli!erate action of his o%n contrivin$ ã Hamlet9s comment a!o#t rashness$ )p$ 6=7, ã Aain he finds reasons for p#ttin off action$ )p$ 6=+, ã He feels resined to fate defyin <a##ry9$ )6-7, ã He is interested in his posth#mo#s rep#tation$ )p$ 66.,
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