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Manpower survey 1993: Occupational information

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Manpower survey 1993: Occupational information 1993 Embargo: 08:00 Date: 27 November 1996 Read the following notice with regard to the eleven official languages INTERPRETIVE SUMMARY According to the 1994
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Manpower survey 1993: Occupational information 1993 Embargo: 08:00 Date: 27 November 1996 Read the following notice with regard to the eleven official languages INTERPRETIVE SUMMARY According to the 1994 Manpower Survey a total of people were employed on 25 March 1994 in the formal businesses in non-agricultural sectors (excluding private households). This survey does not cover the unemployed thus the statistics is not representative of the economically active population. Although this is an occupational survey, the information on occupations is derived from samples based on total employment within industries. Although the agricultural sector and private households are also not covered in the Manpower Survey, some occupations that belong in the agricultural sector are sometimes included because the survey is undertaken on the basis of firms which are divided into industrial sectors according to main economic activity. Therefore a particular firm whose main industrial activity is not classified as forming part of the agricultural sector (e.g. its main activity could be classified as manufacturing) may include branches whose main activities are agricultural. Employees in these branches include agricultural workers. Other CSS labour surveys, for example the short-term manufacturing survey, are based on single institutions (or branches). This survey is based on firms, which may have one or more branches. Therefore the results are not strictly comparable. The results of the 1994 survey show a decrease of workers (-3,3%) compared with the survey of 26 March 1993 and a decrease of workers (-7,8%) compared with the survey of 27 March The distribution according to population group is (50,5%) African/Black workers, (11,9%) Coloured workers, (4,7%) Indian/Asian workers, (27,5%) White workers and (5,5%) unspecified workers. With regard to gender, females represent (30,4%) workers, males (64,2%) workers and unspecified workers (5,5%). The category unspecified is the result of certain respondents not specifying the gender or population group of their workers. OCCUPATIONAL INCREASES Major occupational increases: The managerial, executive and administrative occupations represent 4,1% or workers of the total number of workers and show an increase of workers (4,3%) compared with the 1993 survey, however, a decrease of workers (-2,8%) was recorded compared with the survey of 27 March The population group distribution of posts in the managerial occupations showed some major changes in 1994 with increases of 50,8% or workers among African males, 43,9% or 847 workers among African females, 31,0% or 413 workers among Asian females, 21,0% or 446 workers among Coloured females and 15,2% or workers among Asian males. Although a decrease of -4,0% or workers was recorded among White male managers this category still remained higher than the other population groups. See graph. The highest vacancy rate for the 1994 survey namely 3,9% ( vacancies) was recorded in the category professional, semi-professional and technical occupations. Detail occupational increases: In the major occupational group professional, semi-professional and technical occupations major increases were noted in occupations therapist not elsewhere classified (processing code 128) workers (7 538,1%), adult education teacher (processing code 161) workers or 206,7% and education professions not elsewhere classified (processing code 168) 704 workers or 179,6%. This increase can be attributed to workers appointed into newly created posts resulting from restructuring of establishments. For the managerial, executive and administrative occupations, large increases in occupations legislative and related official not elsewhere classified (processing code 233) 222 workers or 151,0% and managers in catering services (processing code 267) workers or 60,3% were recorded. The increase was attributed to the expansion of establishments and more appointments. New appointments and restructuring also resulted in and increase of 647 workers or 43,7% for fixed property, insurance, stocks managers (processing code 266). In the clerical and sales occupations, increases were recorded in the occupation administrative and senior administrative officials (processing code 278) of workers or 40,5%. This was due to more workers appointed in these posts. For the artisans, apprentice and related occupations, an increase of 235 workers or 71,4% for the armature winder artisan (processing code 582), 354 workers or 74,1% for electronic fitter artisan (processing code 596) and 248 workers or 41,6% for woodworking machine operator artisan (processing code 624) was reflected. The increase was due to workers appointed in these posts. OCCUPATIONAL DECREASES Major occupational decreases: Decreases of more than 5,0% occurred in major occupational groups transport, delivery and communication occupations (-5,3% or workers), farming and related occupations (-9,0% or workers), production foreman and supervisor, miner and quarry worker, (-5,5% or workers), operator, production worker and related semi-skilled worker (-5,5% or workers) and labourer (-5,7% or workers). Detail occupational decreases: The decrease of workers (-40,0%) in the occupation clerical supervisor, cashier and related occupations (processing code 281) was mainly due to retrenchment of workers. For the occupation air hostess, ground hostess, cabin official, flight steward (processing code 361) the decrease of workers (-41,3%) was attributed to restructuring within the firms. The closure of firms or division of firms resulted in the decrease in the number of workers for the occupations labour, labour relations official (processing code 179), forestry worker (processing code 427) and sheet-metal worker (processing code 546). INDUSTRIAL SECTORS The wholesale, retail and motor trade and catering and accommodation services sector is the only sector that showed an increase namely 1,3% or workers. The other industrial sectors showed decreases in the number of workers, with relatively large decreases shown by fishing (-30,8% or workers), transport, storage and communication (-9,6% or workers), electricity, gas and water (-7,2% or workers), manufacturing (-6,0% or workers) and mining and quarrying (-5,6% or workers). EXPLANATORY NOTES 1. SCOPE OF THE SURVEY 1.1 The survey includes establishments in the PRIVATE SECTOR (individuals, partnerships, companies, co-operatives and close corporations) as well as institutions in the PUBLIC SECTOR (government departments, provincial administrations, the government departments of the former self-governing territories, local authorities, parastatal institutions, universities and technikons, public corporations and agricultural marketing boards) in the Republic of South Africa, excluding the former TBVC states. This problem of exclusion will be addressed in The universe consists of firms/establishments in nine major industrial divisons, viz. Fisheries; Mining and quarrying; Manufacturing; Electricity, gas and water; Construction; Trade, catering and accommodation services; Transport, storage and communication; Finance, insurance, real estate and business services and Community, social and personal services. These major divisions are subdivided into groups and subgroups according to the Standard Industrial Classification of all Economic Activities, (fifth edition), January However, occupational groups derived from these industries are classified according to the Standard Classification of Occupations, (first edition), December Workers in the informal sector as well as workers employed in the agricultural sector and domestics and garden workers employed by private households, are excluded. Although the agricultural sector and private households are not covered in the Manpower Survey, occupations such as forester or seed grower that belong in the agricultural sector are sometimes included, because the survey is undertaken on the basis of main economic activity of firms. For example, a particular firm whose main industrial activity is manufacturing may include branches whose main activity is farming and may therefore include agricultural workers. 1.4 The survey covers the number of workers in fixed occupational categories according to race and gender, as well as the total number of vacancies in fixed occupational categories. 1.5 Questionnaires, processing manuals, the Standard Industrial Classification and the Standard Classification of Occupations are available from the CSS on request. 2. BASIS OF THE SURVEY 2.1 The data are collected on the BASIS OF FIRMS. For the purpose of this survey a firm means a legal entity consisting of one or more establishments (branches, including the head office, but excluding holding or subsidiary companies). If the firm consists of more than one establishment, such individual establishments can be active in one sector or distributed over various sectors of the economy (e.g. fishing, mining, manufacturing, commerce and services). A firm is classified according to the sector in which it is predominantly engaged. 3. SURVEY 3.1 Approximately firms were involved in the 1994 survey. In some cases, for example central government, all departments completed the questionnaire (complete list), whereas in other cases a sample of firms was drawn (as described below). -All relevant firms completed the questionnaire in the case of: Electricity, gas and water Agricultural marketing boards Banks, building societies and insurance companies Transnet Ltd SA Post Office Ltd and Telkom SA Ltd Central Government Provincial administrations Former self-governing territories SABC Regional services councils Parastatal institutions Universities and technikons 3.2 In all other cases a sample was drawn from a list of firms in the following manner: - The firms in each industrial group/subgroup were divided into one of three categories according to the size of their employment, namely stratum 1, 2 or 3. Stratum 1 consists of large employers, but the actual number of workers in firms in Stratum 1 varies by type of industry. The cut-off points, or proportion of firms drawn for Stratum 1, 2 and 3, were 80%, 15% and 5% respectively. For example in the leather industry, Stratum 1 consists of firms with 80 or more workers, whereas in the clothing industry, it consists of firms with 350 or more workers. Stratum 2 consists of medium-sized firms, also varying according to number of workers by industry, whereas Stratum 3 consists of small-sized firms. 3.3 Sample frame:. Census of Mining, 1988 (series 2001), and additions. Census of Manufacturing, 1988 (series 3001), and additions. Census of Construction, 1988 (series 5001), and additions. Wholesale trade (series 6141). Retail trade (series 6242). Motor trade (series 6343). Hotels (series 6441). Census of Transport and allied services (series 7101), and additions. Letting of own fixed property (series 8302). Accounting, auditing and bookkeeping services (series 8311). Legal services (series 8312). Advertising services (series 8313). Consulting engineering services (series 8314). Employment placement agencies and recruiting organisations (series 8315). Data processing and tabulating services (series 8316). Hairdresser and beauty parlours (series 9501). Photographic services (series 9502). Undertakers and crematoriums (series 9503). Laundries, laundry services and cleaning and dyeing services (series 9504). Motion picture production (series 9401). Motion picture distribution (series 9402). Welfare organisations (series 9307). Employers registered at the Compensation Commissioner 4. COMPARABILITY WITH PREVIOUS MANPOWER SURVEYS AND OTHER SURVEYS OF THE CSS 4.1 The classification of occupations used since the 1988 Manpower Survey is based on the Standard Classification of Occupations, Report No , (first edition), This classification of occupations differs from the classification of occupations that was used in manpower surveys before The information in this report is thus not, in all cases, comparable with the information published for manpower surveys prior to The addresses from which samples are selected are obtained from address sources of the Central Statistical Service and those of the Compensation Commissioner and Satour. For surveys prior to 1990, samples were selected from addresses of the Compensation Commissioner for fisheries; waterdrill contractors; catering and accommodation services; sections of major division transport, storage and communication; sections of major division financing, insurance, real estate and business services and most of major division community, social and personal services (e.g. hairdressers, undertakers, ballrooms and cinemas, accountants, auditors, advocates and attorneys). 4.3 For manpower surveys as from 1990, all sampling addresses for the major division of construction are obtained from our own sources. The addresses of wholesale and retail trade establishments are obtained from our own sources. Addresses for catering and accommodation services, except for the addresses of hotels, are obtained from the Compensation Commissioner. Samples for the major division of transport, storage and communication were completely re-selected from our own sources, except for taxi services and driving schools, which are obtained from the address sources of the Compensation Commissioner. 4.4 Concerning the major division of finance, insurance, real estate and business services, samples for owning and letting of property; town developing; legal services; accounting, auditing and bookkeeping services; data processing services; consulting engineering services, advertising services and employment placement agencies and recruiting organisations, which, before 1990, were selected from the Compensation Commissioner's addresses, are now (as from 1990) selected from sources of the Central Statistical Service. 4.5 For the major division of community, social and personal services, samples for welfare services; motion picture and video recordings; motion picture projections and motion picture and video rentings; laundries, laundry services and cleaning and dyeing plants; photographic studios; undertakers and crematoriums and miscellaneous personal services are selected from sources of the Central Statistical Service. However, samples for a large section of this major division are still selected from addresses of the Compensation Commissioner. 4.6 In Tables 3.2 and 4.1 totals of male and female workers as well as totals by population group do not add up to the total number of workers. This is due to certain respondents not specifying the gender or population group of their employees. 4.7 Total employment per major industrial divisions (Table 3) or industrial groups (Table 4) differ from the totals of other surveys of the CSS. These differences can be ascribed to the fact that the Manpower Survey is enumerated on a firm basis while other surveys are enumerated mainly on an establishment basis. In many cases a firm consists of only one establishment or two or more establishments that practise the same kind of economic activity, so that a specific institution will be classified to the same kind of economic activity, regardless of the basis of the survey. In the case of firms with activities classifiable to various major divisions of the Standard Industrial Classification, the firm is classified according to the main activity that is carried out by the firm. For example, an establishment of a firm can primarily be engaged in trawling, while the firm's main activity is manufacturing. On the firm basis, the workers of this establishment will therefore not be assigned to the major division agriculture, hunting, forestry and fishing, but will be assigned to the major division manufacturing, where the firm as a whole resorts. Therefore the occupation fisherman, fish breeder and related worker (processing code 430) will not appear only under the major division agriculture, hunting, forestry and fishing, but may also appear under the major division manufacturing. In the same way workers in mining occupations (processing codes ) will not necessarily appear only under the major division mining and quarrying, but can be assigned to any major division of the Standard Industrial Classification, depending on the main activity of the firm. 4.8 Where the number of workers shown in a certain occupation differs from that shown in the previous report, it was confirmed by means of enquiries. 4.9 Inconsistent reporting of a specific occupation by respondents has the result that occupations differ from those shown in the previous report.

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