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Noise legislation:- UK:-The Control of Noise at Work Regulations 2005 Irish: - The Regulations are the General Application Regulations 2007, Chapter 1 of Part 5: Control of Noise at Work EU: - Directive 2003/10/EC Canada: - Canada Labour Code, Part II, (R.S.C. 1985, c. L-2) Canada Occupational Safety and Health Regulations, (SOR/86-304) Section 7.4(1)(b) USA:- OSHA Standards - 29 CFR Standard Number: 1910.95 ã Title: Occupational noise exposure What should workers be in
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  Noise legislation:- UK  :-The Control of Noise at Work Regulations 2005 Irish : - The Regulations are the General Application Regulations 2007, Chapter 1 of Part 5: Control of Noise at Work EU : - Directive 2003/10/EC Canada : - Canada Labour Code, Part II, (R.S.C. 1985, c. L-2) Canada Occupational Safety and Health Regulations, (SOR/86-304) Section 7.4(1)(b) USA :- OSHA Standards - 29 CFR    Standard Number : 1910.95 ã Title : Occupational noise exposure What should workers be informed if noise exposure level too high    The noise level is likely to exceed 85 dBA and of the potential risk of damage to hearing.    The measurements taken of the noise levels and an explanation of the significance of the results.    About what is being done to reduce the noise levels. What action should be taken when the noise exposure level is too high?    Identify the reasons for the excess noise and put in place a programme to reduce it.    Provided engineering and organizational controls to reduce the noise levels.    Provide the services of a registered medical practitioner to carry out hearing checks and audiometric testing.    Put up clearly visible and legible signs indicating that the noise level in the area is likely to exceed 85dB (A).  How long a worker should be exposed to noise? The potential risk to an employee’s  hearing can be related to the length of time a  person is exposed to certain levels of noise, both daily and the cumulative amounts over a number of years. What are daily/weekly exposure action values? These relate to:    The levels of exposure to noise of your employees averaged over a working day or week; and    The maximum noises (peak sound pressure) to which employees are exposed in a working day. The values are: Lower exposure action values:    Daily or weekly exposure of 80 dB.    Peak sound pressure of 135 dB. Upper exposure action values:    Daily or weekly exposure of 85 dB.    Peak sound pressure of 137 dB. When should a risk assessment for noise be carried out?    When employees are liable to be exposed to noise at work, which is above lower exposure.    When employees are exposed to levels of noise whose safety or health is at a  particular risk.    A ny effects on employees’ safety and health resulting from any interactions  between noise and work-related to toxic substances, and between noise and vibrations.    Where there is an indirect effect on employees’ safety or health from interaction between noise and warning signals, or other sounds which need to be observed in order to reduce risks of accidents.    When information on noise emission is provided by the manufactures of work equipment.     If there is an extension of noise exposure beyond the normal working hours, which under the employer’s responsibility.      When alternative equipment is made available to reduce noise emission. What should an employer give particular attention to when carrying out a risk assessment?    The level, type and duration of the exposure.    The work employees carry out or are likely to carry out.    The routine in which work is been carried out by employees.    Variations in the type of work.    Identification of the immediate risk.    Identify what is possible to control, and how the risk can be reduced.    The exposure limit values and the exposure action values.    The availability of alternative equipment which is provided to reduce the noise emission.    That ear protection is available and must be worn. Ten sources of noise in our workplace environment    Furnace/ heater.    Compressors.    Electric motors.    Mechanical machines.    Woodworking machines.    Pneumatic tools.    Ventilator fans.    Construction sites.     Noisy equipment (e.g. grinder & cutting machines).    Some vehicles (e.g. tractor & crane)

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