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project from english and it help you to hidgh your schoolnmkjkjkjk;cxvjkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkljkl
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  Poem My mistress’ eyes are nothing like the sun  (Sonnet 130)  William Shakespeare, 1564 –  1616 My mistress’ eyes are nothing like the sun;   Coral is far more red than her lips’ red;  If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun; If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head. I have seen roses damasked, red and white, But no such roses see I in her cheeks; And in some perfumes is there more delight Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks. I love to hear her speak, yet well I know That music hath a far more pleasing sound; I grant I never saw a goddess go; My mistress when she walks treads on the ground. And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare As any she belied with false compare. Rhyme Schemes    My mistress’ eyes are nothing like the sun (Sonnet 130)  William Shakespeare, 1564 –  1616 My mistress’ eyes are nothing like the sun;  A Coral is far more red than her lips’ red;  B If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun; A If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head. B I have seen roses damasked, red and white, C But no such roses see I in her cheeks; D And in some perfumes is there more delight C Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks. D I love to hear her speak, yet well I know E That music hath a far more pleasing sound; F I grant I never saw a goddess go; G My mistress when she walks treads on the ground. F And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare H As any she belied with false compare. H   Meaning of the Poem Sonnet 130 is the poet's pragmatic tribute to his uncomely mistress, commonly referred to as the dark lady because of her dun complexion. The dark lady, who ultimately betrays the poet, appears in sonnets 127 to 154. Sonnet 130 is clearly a parody of the conventional love sonnet, made popular by Petrarch and, in particular, made popular in England by Sidney's  use of the Petrarchan form in his epic poem Astrophel and Stella  . If you compare the stanzas of Astrophel and Stella   to Sonnet 130, you will see exactly what elements of the conventional love sonnet Shakespeare is light-heartedly mocking. In Sonnet 130, there is no use of grandiose metaphor or allusion; he does not compare his love to  Venus, there is no evocation to Morpheus, etc. The ordinary beauty and humanity of his lover are important to Shakespeare in this sonnet, and he deliberately uses typical love poetry metaphors against themselves. In Sidney's work, for example, the features of the poet's lover are as beautiful and, at times, more beautiful than the finest pearls, diamonds, rubies, and silk. In Sonnet 130, the references to such objects of perfection are indeed present, but they are there to illustrate that his lover is not as beautiful -- a total rejection of Petrarch form and content. Shakespeare utilizes a new structure, through which the straightforward theme of his lover’s simplicity can be developed in the three quatrains and neatly concluded in the final couplet. Thus, Shakespeare is using all the techniques available, including the sonnet structure itself, to enhance his parody of the traditional Petrarchan sonnet typified by Sidney’s work. But Shakespeare ends the sonnet by proclaiming his love for his mistress despite her lack of adornment, so he does finally embrace the fundamental theme in Petrarch's sonnets: total and consuming love. Reflection The theme of this poem is to reflect and understand true love; true love is   loving one another's imperfections. This poem explains the imperfections and   even flaws of the writer's love. He speaks of her eyes being nothing like the   sun , her lips not as red as coral, her breasts an off-white color, her cheeks   less red than roses, and her voice not as pleasant as music. He even becomes   a bit insulting when he points out that her hairs are like black wires, her   breath reeks, and that she treads on the ground when she walks. But despite   all these things, he still loves to hear her speak and finds his love rare,   recognizable by heaven.    Matatalaib High School Matatalaib Tarlac City POEM ANALYSIS ( My mistress’ eyes are nothing like the sun)  (Sonnet 130) Submitted By : Ramces Ramac IV-Alcaraz
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