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Brazil Soybean Transportation a quarterly publication of the Transportation and Marketing Programs/Transportation Services Division www.ams.usda.gov/AgTransportation Overview of Brazilian Soybean 2011 Transportation. The record 2011 soybean crop, limited port capacity, and lack of alternative transportation modes and routes to export ports, drove Brazilian truck rates to the highest level since 2005 (figure 1 and table 6). However, higher farm prices and lower ocean rates to major export routes
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  Brazil Soybean Transportation 1 February 14, 2012 Overview of Brazilian Soybean 2011 Transportation.  The record 2011 soybean crop, limited port capacity, and lack of alternative transportation modes and routes to export ports, drove Brazilian truck rates to the highest level since 2005 (gure 1 and table 6). However, higher farm prices and lower ocean rates to major export routes offset the rise in truck rates, resulting in a lower total landed cost to China and Europe compared to last year (tables 1 and 2). Brazilian soybean exports increased 14 percent by volume from 2010, to 33 million metric ton (mt) from 29 million mt (Secretariat of Foreign Trade (SECEX), MDIC). Exports by value increased 48 percent to US$16.3 billion from US$11 billion in 2010, caused by higher commodity prices and the appreciation of the Brazilian Real (R$) against the U.S. dollar (US$). Throughout 2011, the Brazilian Real appreciated 4.8 percent against the U.S. dollar, from R$1.75957 per 1 US$ to 1.6751. China is Brazil’s major soybean buyer, accounting for 67 percent of total exports. China bought 22.1 million mt of Brazilian soybeans in 2011, valued at nearly US$11.0 billion. China usually buys soybeans shipped from the southern ports of Santos, Paranaguá, and Rio Grande through the Cape of Good Hope in South Africa to Shanghai. For example, the Port of Santos, Paranaguá, and Rio Grande accounted for nearly 76 percent of total Brazilian soybean exports to China. Typically, the peak of Brazilian soybean exports occurs in May. By the end of August, about 80 percent of the year’s soybeans are exported. Brazil Soybean Transportation a quarterly publication of the Transportation and Marketing Programs/Transportation Services Division www.ams.usda.gov/AgTransportationFebruary 14, 2012Contents Brazil Soybean Transportation IndicatorsBrazil Soybean Transportation Guide: 2010 (PDF)Contact InformationData SetsSubscription Information Figure 1. Brazilian Soybean Export Truck Cost Index Source: ESALQ/ USP (University of São Paulo, Brazil) and USDA/AMS  4.00 5.00 6.00 7.00 8.00 9.00 10.00 11.00 12.00 13.00 14.001234    U   S   $   /   M   T   /   1   0   0  m   i   l  e  s 200920102011 Average 2011: $11.71   Average 2010: $10.74Average 2009: $8.74  Brazil Soybean Transportation 2 February 14, 2012 Transportation costs as a percentage of total landed costs decreased 5–21 percent (see tables 1 and 2). Farm prices measured in US$ rose on average almost 24 percent (18 percent when measured in R$). In 2011, transportation costs represented 28–31 percent of the total landed costs of shipping soybeans from Sorriso, North Mato Grosso (MT), to Shanghai and Hamburg through Santos and Paranaguá, compared to 43–45 percent in 2006. The cost of shipping a metric ton of soybeans 100 miles by truck increased 9 percent, from $10.74 in 2010 to $11.71 in 2011. According to the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (IBGE) and Brazil Central Bank , in 2011 the Brazilian economy slowed to a rate of growth of 2.9 percent from 7.6 percent in 2010. The average Gross Domestic Product (GDP) growth rate from 2001 to 2010 was 3.6 percent; during 1991–2000 it was 2.6 percent. The actual ination rate increased to 6.5 percent from 5.91 percent last year. The Brazilian economy is expected to grow 3.1 percent in 2012. For more information contact Delmy L. Salin at delmy.salin@usda.gov.  Table 1. Cost of transporting soybeans from Brazil to Shanghai, China 200620072008200920102011% Change 10-11200620072008200920102011% Change 10-11 North MT 1  - Santos 2  --US$/mt--Northwest RS 1  - Rio Grande 2 --US$/mt-- Truck79.4697.67115.7497.00116.78123.315.616.1621.8222.2924.5028.1838.9438.2Ocean57.3182.8370.3858.7855.8450.50-9.655.8181.5672.0859.4258.2151.10-12.2Total transportation136.77180.51186.12155.78172.62173.810.771.97103.3794.3783.9286.3990.034.2Farm price  3 164.88233.82358.99324.34318.15392.1023.2210.34267.06394.66359.51344.90415.8720.6Landed cost301.65414.33545.11480.12490.77565.9115.3282.31370.43489.03443.43431.29505.9017.3Transport % of landed cost45.443.934.132.638.630.6-20.725.228.119.419.020.117.8-11.6 North Central PR 1  - Paranagua 2 --US$/mt--South GO 1  - Santos 2 --US$/mt-- Truck21.3132.3633.6027.3734.5139.5414.643.5650.4755.3350.8364.7163.92-1.2Ocean56.3180.8171.6659.0058.9257.32-2.757.3182.8370.3858.7855.8450.50-9.6Total transportation77.62113.18105.2686.3793.4396.863.7100.87133.30125.71109.62120.56114.42-5.1Farm price  3 213.81281.14399.31372.46350.44431.6623.2189.63268.65373.13338.31324.27412.8927.3Landed cost291.43394.32504.56458.83443.87528.5219.1290.50401.95498.84447.93444.82527.3118.5Transport % of landed cost26.528.921.018.921.218.4-13.534.633.525.424.627.421.7-20.7  1 Producing regions: RS = Rio Grande do Sul, MT= Mato Grosso, GO = Goiás, PR = Paraná 2 Export ports 3 Source: Companhia Nacional de Abastecimento (CONAB) www.conab.gov.br  Source: ESALQ/USP (University of São Paulo, Brazil) and USDA/AMS  Brazil Soybean Transportation 3 February 14, 2012 Table 2. Cost of transporting soybeans from Brazil to Hamburg, Germany 200620072008200920102011% Change 10-11200620072008200920102011% Change 10-11 North MT 1  - Santos 2  --US$/mt--Northwest RS 1  - Rio Grande 2 --US$/mt-- Truck79.4697.67115.7497.00116.78123.315.616.1621.8222.2924.5028.1837.5433.2Ocean46.7673.0152.3632.4833.6334.653.045.0371.7354.3033.7936.0336.120.2Total transportation126.22170.68168.10129.48150.40157.965.061.1893.5576.6058.3064.2173.6514.7Farm price  3 164.88233.82358.99324.34318.15392.1023.2210.34267.06394.66359.51344.90415.8720.6Landed cost291.11404.50527.09453.82468.55550.0617.4271.53360.61471.26417.80409.11489.5219.7Transport % of landed cost43.442.531.628.732.628.7-11.822.326.116.114.015.815.0-4.9 North Central PR 1  - Paranagua 2 --US$/mt--South GO 1  - Santos 2 --US$/mt-- Truck21.3132.3633.6027.3734.5139.5414.643.5650.4780.6150.8364.7163.92-1.2Ocean45.7671.0553.8133.3435.0834.95-0.446.7673.0152.3632.4833.6334.653.0Total transportation67.07103.4287.4160.7169.5974.487.090.32123.48132.9783.3298.3498.570.2Farm price  3 213.81281.14399.30372.46350.44431.6623.2189.63268.65358.99338.31324.27412.8927.3Landed cost280.88384.56486.71433.17420.03506.1520.5279.96392.12491.97421.63422.61511.4621.0Transport % of landed cost23.827.017.914.116.814.7-12.132.231.826.919.823.619.3-18.2  1 Producing regions: RS = Rio Grande do Sul, MT= Mato Grosso, GO = Goiás, PR = Paraná 2 Export ports 3 Source: Companhia Nacional de Abastecimento (CONAB) www.conab.gov.br  Source: ESALQ/USP (University of São Paulo, Brazil) and USDA/AMS  Brazil Soybean Transportation 4 February 14, 2012 Figure 2. Routes 1  and regions considered in the Brazilian soybean export transportation indicator 2 Routes to Export Ports   Routes to Salvador  Routes to Santos Routes to Paranaguá Routes to Rio Grande 1 Table dening routes by number is shown on page 8 2 Regions comprised about 81 percent of Brazilian soybean production, 2009Source: ESALQ/ USP (University of São Paulo, Brazil) and USDA/AMS
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