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[1] What is Nuclear Power? Nuclear power is energy contained in atoms. This energy can be released as heat from a chain reaction in a radioactive element such as uranium. Nuclear power stations use this heat to produce steam, which drives turbines to generate electricity. According to the illustrative scenario published by the Committee on Climate Change, nuclear might deliver around 40% of the UK generation mix in 2030. Nuclear fuel is made from uranium ore. This concentrate
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   [1] What is Nuclear Power? Nuclear power is energy contained in atoms. This energy can be released as heat from a chain reaction in a radioactive element such as uranium. Nuclear power stations use this heat to produce steam, which drives turbines to generate electricity. According to the illustrative scenario published by the Committee on Climate Change, nuclear might deliver around 40% of the UK generation mix in 2030. Nuclear fuel is made from uranium ore. This concentrates the naturally occurring radiation and enables nuclear power stations to generate electricity. End-of-life decommissioning is a vital part of waste handling and safety in the nuclear energy industry. Decommissioning is the process of dismantling and decontaminating a nuclear facility –  for example, a nuclear power station, a uranium mine, a waste storage or reprocessing plant, or a military site –  at the end of its operational life.(when a company decides to shut down there nuclear power plant) A site can only be considered fully decommissioned once all radioactive material has either been removed or decayed to a level safe enough that the site can be made available for other uses. Depending on the decommissioning strategy used, this can take decades. The Office for Nuclear Regulation (ONR), the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) and the Environment Agency (or Scottish Environment Protection Agency) are the bodies responsible for overseeing, regulating and approving decommissioning activities in the UK. [2]   Worldwide map of nuclear power stations and earthquake zones  - [3] Nuclear fission is the splitting of atomic nuclei. Nuclear power stations use the fission of uranium-235 to heat water. Fusion is the joining of atomic nuclei. Nuclear power stations A power station makes electricity. Fossil fuel (coal, oil and gas) power stations and nuclear (uranium) power stations all use the same processes to make electricity from heat energy. These are: 1.   Fuel produces heat, which is used to boil water to make steam.  2.   Steam spins a turbine. 3.   Turbine drives a generator and the generator makes electricity. 4.   Electricity goes to the transformers to produce the correct voltage. The only difference between fossil fuel and nuclear power stations is how the water is heated. Fossil fuel power stations burn a chemical fuel while a nuclear power station uses the fission of uranium nuclei to generate heat. Fission is another word for splitting. The process of splitting a nucleus is called nuclear fission. Uranium is a non-renewable energy resource and, like the fossil fuels, it cannot be replaced once it has all been used up. [4] Against: The risks of Nuclear Power and Impacts on the environment. Each year, enormous quantities of radioactive waste are created during the nuclear fuel process, including 2,000 metric tons of high-level radioactive waste (1) and 12 million cubic feet of low-level radioactive waste(2) in the U.S. alone. More than 58,000 metric tons of highly radioactive spent fuel already has accumulated at reactor sites around the U.S. for which there currently is no permanent repository. Even without new nuclear production, the inventory of commercial spent fuel in the U.S. already exceeds the 63,000 metric ton statutory capacity of the controversial Yucca Mountain repository, which has yet to receive a license to operate. Even if Yucca Mountain is licensed, the Department of Energy has stated that it would not open before 2017. Uranium, which must be removed from the ground, is used to fuel nuclear reactors. Uranium mining, which creates serious health and environmental  problems, has disproportionately impacted indigenous people because much of the world’s uranium is located under indigenous land.  Uranium miners experience higher rates of lung cancer, tuberculosis and other respiratory diseases. The production of 1,000 tons of uranium fuel generates approximately 100,000 tons of radioactive tailings and nearly one million gallons of liquid waste containing heavy metals and arsenic in addition to radioactivity.(3) These uranium tailings have contaminated rivers and lakes. A new method of uranium mining, known as in-situ leaching, does not produce tailings but it does threaten contamination of groundwater water supplies [5] The government wants to build new nuclear power stations. If their plan succeeds, it will be at the cost of blocking the real solutions to climate change and a reliable future energy supply. It will also result in the continued production of dangerous nuclear waste and an increased risk from terrorism, radioactive accident and nuclear proliferation. Climate change New nuclear power stations would not stop climate change. Even at the most optimistic build rate - 10 new reactors by 2024 –  our carbon emissions would only be cut by four per cent: far too little, far too late. Given the nuclear industry’s poor track record it's highly unlikely that ten reactors could be built within two decades. The most contemporary example of building a new reactor is in Finland; just one year into construction, the completion date has been delayed by 18 months and its costs have spiralled by up to 2 billion Euros over budget. Worse still, new investment in nuclear power and its infrastructure will block development of renewable energy and energy efficiency –  the real solutions to climate change. Radioactive waste The UK now has enough radioactive waste to fill the Royal Albert Hall five times over. There’s still no safe way to deal with it. The government plans to bury it
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