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SING ANY MELODY INSTANTLY by Mar k Ph il l ips Also available: Sight-Read Any Rhythm Instantly, by Mark Phillips (02500457) I SBN 1- S7SL0- 514- 7 Copyright © 2002 Cherry Lane Music Company International Copyright Secured All Rights Reserved The music, text, design and graphics in this publication are protectec by cc~, -c~ iam Any duplication or transmission, by any means, electronic, mechanical photocopying, recording or otherwise, is an infringement of copyright. Visit our websit
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  SING ANY MELODY INSTANTLY  by  M ark  P hillips  Also available: Sight-Read Any Rhythm Instantly , by Mark Phillips ( 02500457 ) ISBN 1-S7SL0-514-7 Copyright © 2002 Cherry Lane Music Company International Copyright Secured All Rights ReservedThe music, text, design and graphics in this publication are protectec by cc~, -c~ i am   Any duplication or transmission, by any means, electronic, mechanical photocopying, recording or otherwise, is an infringement of copyright. Visit our website at www.cherrylane.com  ifTjEjil  I ntroduction  What Is Sight-Singing? Practically every movie that depicts the life story of a famous songwriter contains a scene in which the compos-er hands a (usually female) singer a newly written song and says, “Try this.” The singer then takes one look at the sheet of paper and bursts into song. What she’s doing is known as sight-singing  —the reading and simulta-neous singing of an unfamiliar melody. Watching the film, you may wonder:  How does she do that?  After all. nobody has played the melody for her on an instrument, and there are no little valves on her neck (like those on a trumpet) that she can press to achieve the correct pitches.If you’ve ever tried to learn sightsinging yourself, that type of Hollywood scene can be frustrating. How is it, you might ask, that the pretty singer in the movie, who probably doesn’t have perfect pitch (most people don’t) and who probably never even studied music theory, can sightsing flawlessly when your own attempts have been, at  best, hesitant and blundering?One answer is that the movie is fictionalized. Most people (even sightsinging teachers) can’t sightsing as effort-lessly as does the singer in that film. (And you know that the situation is bogus because in the middle of the song she continues singing even as she looks away from the sheet music to smile at the composer.) But a better answer is that it really is possible to sightsing effortlessly—if you know the trick.  About This Book  Many people learn to sightsing when they study music theory and eartraining in college. But many college pro-grams are ineffective. I know of one university that doesn’t teach their music majors any particular method of sightsinging; instead, the students are expected to somehow divine the correct pitches. Another school I know of does teach a method, but it’s one (based on intervals) that doesn’t work. (See Chapter 1 for an explanation of why the “interval” method is flawed.)This book teaches you a sightsinging technique, or trick, that truly works. And the amazing thing is that—just as Dorothy had the ability to get back to Kansas all along (by clicking her heels together three times)—you’ve had the ability to sightsing all along! If you doubt that, here’s proof. Imagine that you’re about to sing in front of a group of people. Say you’re at a party and you’ve been asked to sing “Happy Birthday to You.” Once the piano  player establishes the key by giving you a short introduction,  you automatically hit the correct starting note.  And you didn’t even have to think about it; the first note’s pitch came effortlessly from within you. Wouldn’t it be nice if sightsinging were that simple? Well, actually it is—because the crux of the technique that this book teaches is  based entirely on something you already possess: a natural ability (once a key has been established) to correct-ly sing the first note of any wellknown song (but more on this in Chapter 1).  Who Is This Book For? This book is for anyone—college music majors, chorus members, professional singers—who wants to be able to look at a piece of written music and instantly sing it aloud. But it’s also for anyone—conductors, instrumentalists, song publishers, music editors, arrangers—who wants to be able to look at written music and hear the sound of the notes in his head.  What You Need to Know to Use This Book  To use this book you need to know (1) how to read music, (2) how to determine what key a piece of music is in (by looking at the key signature), and (3) what degree of the scale (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, or 7) any particular note in that key represents. If you can’t read music, then this book is beyond your grasp. But even if you don’t know how to determine keys or scale degrees, you can learn that by studying “Appendix B: Major and Minor Scales Identified by Letter Name and Scale Degree.” By the way, the sightsinging exercises presented here contain no difficult or tricky rhythms. But if you need help with rhythmic reading, see my Sight-Read Any Rhythm Instantly  (Cherry Lane Music, 02500457).   About the Music Examples Anyone writing an instructional book on sightsinging must make certain decisions concerning such issues as keys and clefs. For example, does one write exercises in all 12 major and minor keys, or in only the more commonly used keys? And does one duplicate all treble clef examples in bass clef? For the sake of brevity and “userfriend liness,” I wrote all the examples in common keys only (no more than four sharps or flats in the key signature) and in treble clef only (as more treble clef readers exist than do bass clef readers). But because the technique (or thought process) this book teaches applies to any key and any clef, you should have no trouble sightsinging music in less common keys or in bass clef. By the way, if you want to use this book to practice sightsinging in difficult keys or in bass clef, you can mentally change a key signature or clef, then simply sing the notes as writ-ten, but in the new key.Whereas some sightsinging books present practice examples contrived by the author, this book features actual   songs  for you to sightsing. Of course, if you were familiar with these songs, you’d be able to sing them from memory and they’d serve no instructional purpose. That’s why Fve chosen songs that, though they’ve stood the test of time, are not currently familiar. I haven’t identified them by title (there’s no reason to), but if you’re curi-ous, they come from a variety of musical realms: folk, classical, popular, patriotic, and international. Now click your heels together three times and let’s sing! —Mark Phillips  C ontents Chapter 1: Learning “1,” “3,” and “5” .................................................................................5Chapter 2: Sight-Singing Songs with “1,” “3,” and “5”..............................................15Chapter 3: Learning “2” and “6” ...................................................................................... 19 Chapter 4: Sight-Singing Songs with “1,” “2,” “3,” “5,” and “6”............................22Chapter 5: Learning “4” and “7” ......................................................................................25Chapter 6: Sight-Singing Songs with All Seven Scale Degrees ............................ 28Chapter 7: Name That Tune................................................................................................32Chapter 8: Songs for Practice (All Pitches, All Keys) ..............................................35Chapter 9: Minor Keys..........................................................................................................46Chapter 10: Sight-Singing Songs in Minor Keys ......................................................51Chapter 11: Chromatic Tones ...........................................................................................57Chapter 12: Sight-Singing Songs with Chromatic T ones.......................................62Appendix A: Establishing the Key (at Piano or Solo Instrument) for All   Major and Minor K ey s.......................................................................................................... 69Appendix B: Major and Minor Scales Identified by Letter Name andScale D egree...............................................................................................................................72Appendix C: Intervals .......................................................................................................... 75Appendix D: Famous Songs for Learning Each Scale D egree...............................78Appendix E: Answers for “Name That Tune” .............................................................80
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